Farewell GitHub, welcome HeavyMelon

I always wanted to land a job with 37signals. Wait? What does this have to do with GitHub? Bear with me. This may be a long post. They recently changed their name to Basecamp. They stopped developing other products, and focused on Basecamp. A project management and team communication tool. They extracted Rails from Basecamp Continue reading Farewell GitHub, welcome HeavyMelon

First impressions after leaving GitHub

I always wondered how it would feel being a GitHub alumni. What would be different? What would catch my eye? Well, now that I am not at GitHub for about 16 days, here’s what I have noticed. Notifications My GitHub and Slack notifications are almost zero now! That’s both good but also weird. Everything is Continue reading First impressions after leaving GitHub

How I avoid zombie GitHub Issues

At GitHub, we rely on Issues heavily. Not only for bug reports, or for tracking feature implementation. We use them for almost everything. This includes, but is not limited to, discussions, announcements, ideas, tracking projects, capturing thoughts or pieces of documentation that will become pull requests, and many more. The problem with having an abundance Continue reading How I avoid zombie GitHub Issues

How to move long support threads forward

When the topic is complicated, threads are often long, stale, or both. Often, support is distributed across the globe. It’s not surprising to see several people participating in the discussion. If I am a support person in Europe, I may wake up and start working on a thread that starts in North America. The thread Continue reading How to move long support threads forward

The Amiga was so far ahead of its time that almost nobody — including Commodore’s marketing department — could fully articulate what it was all about. Today, it’s obvious the Amiga was the first multimedia computer, but in those days it was derided as a game machine because few people grasped the importance of advanced graphics, sound, and video. Nine years later, vendors are still struggling to make systems that work like 1985 Amigas.

— Byte Magazine, August 1994